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Meaning / Definition of

Broad-base Index

Categories: Stocks,

An index whose purpose is to reveal the performance of the entire market, such as the s&p 500, Wilshire 5000, AMEX Major market index or value line composite index. Different broad-base indices have different approaches to ensuring that the index captures the entire breadth of market activity. The Wilshire 5000 takes the most all-inclusive approach by including all the stocks listed on the new york stock exchange and almost all the stocks listed on the NASDAQ and american stock exchange. The s&p 500 includes 500 companies that are together considered a good indicator for the US stock market, based on the industries the companies operate in, their positions within the industry, and their market capitalizations. The s&p 500 is a market-weighted index, so only 10% if its components make up about 75% of its value. The value line composite index takes an in between approach by tracking 1700 issues. The Value Line Composite is thought to be a better indicator of speculative stocks than of more stable stocks.

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Definition / Meaning of

Gross Margin

Categories: Accounting, Fundamental Analysis, Operation and Production,

Gross margin, sometimes called gross profit, is the percentage by which profits exceed production costs. To find gross margin you divide sales minus production costs by sales. For example, if you want to calculate your gross margin on selling handmade scarves, you need to know how much you spent creating the scarves, and what you collected by selling them.If you sold 10 scarves at $15 a piece, and spent $8 per scarf to make them, your gross margin would be 46.7%, or $150 in sales minus $80 in production costs divided by $150. Gross margin is not the same as gross profit, which is simply sales minus costs. In this example, it's $70, or $150 minus $80. If you're doing research on a company you're considering as an investment, you can look at the gross margin to help you see how efficiently it uses its resources. If the company has a higher gross margin than its competition, it can command higher prices or spends less on production. That might mean it can allocate more resources to developing new products or pursuing other projects.

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