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Meaning / Definition of

Common Shares

Categories: Stocks,

Securities representing equity ownership in a corporation, providing voting rights, and entitling the holder to a share of the company's success throughdividends and/or capital appreciation. In the event of liquidation, common shareholders have rights to a company's assets only after bondholders, other debt holders, and preferred shareholders have been satisfied. Typically, common shareholders receive one vote per share to elect the company's board of directors (although the number of votes is not always directly proportional to the number of shares owned). The board of directors is the group of individuals that represents the owners of the corporation and oversees major decisions for the company. common shareholders also receive voting rights regarding other company matters such as stock splits and company objectives. In addition to voting rights, common shareholders sometimes enjoy what are called "preemptive rights". preemptive rights allow common shareholders>to maintain their proportional ownership in the company in the event that the company issues another offering of stock. This means that common shareholders with preemptive rights have the right but not the obligation to purchase as many new shares of the stock as it would take to maintain their proportional ownership in the company. also called junior equity or common stock.

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Definition / Meaning of

No-load Mutual Fund

Categories: Finance,

You buy a no-load mutual fund directly from the investment company that sponsors the fund. You pay no sales charge, or load, on the fund when you buy or sell shares.Although, no-load funds may charge a redemption fee if you sell before a certain time has elapsed in order to limit short-term turnover. Some fund companies charge an annual fee, called a 12b-1 fee, to offset their marketing costs. Your share of this fee is a percentage of the value of your holdings in the fund.You may also be able to buy no-load funds through a mutual fund network, sometimes known as a mutual fund supermarket, typically sponsored by a discount brokerage firm. If you have an account with the firm, you can choose among no-load funds sponsored by a number of different investment companies.load funds and no-load funds making similar investments tend to produce almost equivalent total returns over the long term - say ten years or more. But it can take an investor nearly that long to offset the higher cost of buying load funds.

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