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Meaning / Definition of

Inflation-protected Security (TIPS)

Categories: Finance,

us treasury inflation-protected securities (TIPS) adust the principal twice a year to reflect inflation or deflation measured by the consumer price index (CPI). The interest rate is fixed and is paid twice a year on the adjusted principal. So if your principal is larger because of inflation you earn more interest. If it's lower because of deflation, you earn less.You can buy TIPS with terms of 5, 10, or 20 year at issue using a TreasuryDirect account or in the secondary market. At maturity you receive either the adjusted principal or par value, whichever is greater. You owe federal income tax on the interest you earn and on inflation adjustments in each year they're added even though you don't receive the increases until the security matures. However, TIPS earnings are exempt from state and local income taxes.These securities provide a safeguard against deflation as well as against inflation since they guarantee that you'll get back no less than par, or face value, at maturity.

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Definition / Meaning of

Weighted Stock Index

Categories: Finance,

In weighted stock indexes, price changes in some stocks have a much greater impact than price changes in others in computing the direction of the overall index. By contrast, in an unweighted index, prices changes in all the stocks have an equal impact.A price weighted index, such as the dow jones industrial average (DJIA), is affected more by the changing prices of higher-priced securities than by changes in the prices of lower-priced securities. Similarly, a market capitalization weighted index, such as the nasdaq composite index, gives more weight to price changes in securities with the highest market values, calculated by multiplying the current price per share by the number of outstanding or floating shares. A capitalization weighted index may also be called a market value weighted index. The theory behind weighting is that price changes in the largest or most expensive securities have a greater impact on the overall economy than price changes in smaller-cap or less expensive stocks. However, some critics argue that strong market performance by the biggest or most expensive stocks can drive an index up, masking stagnant or even declining prices in large segments of the market, and providing a skewed view of the economy.

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