Home > Glossary > Preference Shares

Meaning / Definition of

Preference Shares

Categories: Stocks, Fundamental Analysis, Accounting,

capital stock which provides a specific dividend that is paid before any dividends are paid to common stock holders, and which takes precedence over common stock in the event of a liquidation. Like common stock, preference shares represent partial ownership in a company, although preferred stock shareholders do not enjoy any of the voting rights of common stockholders. Also unlike common stock, preference shares pay a fixed dividend that does not fluctuate, although the company does not have to pay this dividend if it lacks the financial ability to do so. The main benefit to owning preference shares are that the investor has a greater claim on the company's assets than common stockholders. Preferred shareholders always receive their dividends first and, in the event the company goes bankrupt, preferred shareholders are paid off before common stockholders. In general, there are four different types of preferred stock: cumulative preferred stock, non-cumulative preferred stock, participating preferred stock, and convertible preferred stock. also called preferred stock.

Featured term of the day

Definition / Meaning of

529 College Savings Plan

Categories: Finance,

Each 529 college savings plan is sponsored by a particular state or group of states, and while each plan is a little different, they share many basic elements. When you invest in a 529 savings plan, any earnings in your account accumulate tax free, and you can make federally tax-free withdrawals to pay for qualified educational expenses, such as college tuition, room and board, and books at any accredited college, university, vocational, or technical program in the United States and a number of institutions overseas. Some states also exempt earnings from state income tax, and may offer additional advantages to state residents, such as tax deductions for contributions.You must name a beneficiary when you open a 529 savings plan account, but you may change beneficiaries if you wish, as long as the new beneficiary is a member of the same extended family as the original beneficiary.In most cases, you may choose any state's plan, even if neither you nor your beneficiary live in that state. There are no income limits restricting who can contribute to a plan, and the lifetime contributions are more than $300,000 in some states.You can make a one-time contribution of $60,000 without incurring potential gift tax, provided you don't make another contribution for five years. Or, you may prefer to add smaller amounts, up to the annual gift exclusion.

Most popular terms

1. Retired Directors Liability Policies
2. 403(b)
3. Dirty Bomb
4. Life Settlement
5. Limited Severability Provision
6. Special Mobile Equipment
7. Financial Industry Regulation Authority
8. Credit Default Swap
9. Employee Retirement Income Security Act Section 510
10. Competence

Search a term

Keyword:

Browse by alphabet

ABCDEFG
HIJKLMN
OPQRSTU
VWXYZ#

Browse by category

Accounting
Banking
Bankruptcy Assistance
Bonds and Treasuries
Brokerages
Business and Management
Compliance and Governance
Credit and Debt
E-commerce
Economics
Estate Planning
Forex
Fraud
Fundamental Analysis
Futures
Global
Insurance
International Trade
Investing and Trading
Ipos
Legal
Loan and Mortgage
Mergers and Acquisitions
Mutual Funds
Operation and Production
Options
Patent
Personnel Management
Real Estate
Retirement and Pension
Statistics and Risk Management
Stocks
Strategies
Tax
Technical Analysis
Venture Capital