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Meaning / Definition of

Quarter

Categories: Investing and Trading, Accounting, Forex,

The financial world splits up its calendar into four quarters, each three months long. If January to March is the first quarter, April to June is the second quarter, and so on, though a company's first quarter does not have to begin in January.The securities and exchange commission (SEC) requires all publicly held US companies to publish a quarterly report, officially known as Form 10-Q, describing their financial results for the quarter. These reports and the predictions that market analysts make about them often have an impact on a company's stock price.For example, if analysts predict that a certain company will have earnings of 55 cents a share in a quarter, and the results beat those expectations, the price of the company's stock may increase. But if the earnings are less than expected, even by a penny or two, the stock price may drop, at least for a time.However, this pattern doesn't always hold true, and other forces may influence (investor) sentiment about the stock.

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Definition / Meaning of

US Savings Bond

Categories: Investing and Trading, Stocks,

The US government issues two types of savings bonds: Series EE and Series I. You buy electronic series ee bonds through a treasury direct account for face value and paper series EE for half their face value. You earn a fixed rate of interest for the 30-year term of these bonds, and they are guaranteed to double in value in 20 years. series ee bonds issued before May 2005 earn interest at variable rates set twice a year.series i bonds are sold at face value and earn a real rate of return that's guaranteed to exceed the rate of inflation during the term of the bond. Existing series hh bonds earn interest to maturity, but no new series hh bonds are being issued.The biggest difference between savings bonds and us treasury issues is that there's no secondary market for savings bonds since they cannot be traded among investors. You buy them in your own name or as a gift for someone else and redeem them by turning them back to the government, usually through a bank or other financial intermediary.The interest on US savings bonds is exempt from state and local taxes and is federally tax deferred until the bonds are cashed in. At that point, the interest may be tax exempt if you use the bond proceeds to pay qualified higher education expenses, provided that your adjusted gross income (AGI) falls in the range set by federal guidelines and you meet the other conditions to qualify.

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