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Meaning / Definition of

Roth 401(k)

Categories: Retirement and Pension,

The Roth 401(k) retirement plan, which was introduced in 2006, allows you to make after-tax contributions to your account. Earnings may be withdrawn tax free, provided that you are at least 59 1/2 and your account has been open five years or more.Both the Roth 401(k) and the traditional 401(k) have the same contribution limits and distribution requirements. You can add no more than the annual federal limit each year, and you must begin taking required minimum distributions (RMD) by April 1 of the year following the year you reach age 70 1/2. You can postpone RMDs if you are still working.You may not move assets between traditional and Roth 401(k) accounts, though you may be able to split your annual contribution between the two. If you leave your job or retire, you can roll Roth 401(k) assets into a roth ira, just as you can roll traditional 401(k) assets into a traditional ira.Most 401(k) plans, including the Roth, are self-directed, which means you must choose specific investments from among those offered through the plan.

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Definition / Meaning of

Unit Investment Trust (UIT)

Categories: Finance,

A UIT may be a fixed portfolio of bonds with specific maturity dates, a portfolio of income-producing stocks, or a portfolio of all of the securities included in a particular index. Examples of the latter include the DIAMONDs Trust (DIA), which mirrors the composition of the dow jones industrial average (DJIA), and Standard & Poor's depositary receipts (SPDR), which mirrors the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index (s&p 500). Index UITs are also described as exchange traded funds (ETFs).UITs resemble mutual funds in the sense that they offer the opportunity to diversify your portfolio without having to purchase a number of separate securities. You buy units, rather than shares, of the trust, usually through a broker. However, UITs trade more like stocks than mutual funds in the sense that you sell in the secondary market rather than redeeming your holding by selling your units back to the issuing fund. Further, the price of a UIT fluctuates constantly throughout the trading day, just as the price of an individual stock does, rather than being repriced only once a day, after the close of trading. As a result some UITs, though not index-based UITs such as DIAMONDS or SPDRs, trade at prices higher or lower than their net asset value (NAV). One additional difference is that many UITs have maturity dates, when the trust expires, while mutual funds do not. A fund may be closed for other reasons, but not because of a predetermined expiration date.

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