Home > Glossary > Standard & Poor's Depositary Receipt (SPDR)

Meaning / Definition of

Standard & Poor's Depositary Receipt (SPDR)

Categories: Finance,

When you buy SPDRs - pronounced spiders - you're buying shares in a unit investment trust (UIT) that owns a portfolio of stocks included in Standard & Poor's 500-stock index (s&p 500). a share is priced at about 1/10 the value of the s&p 500.Like an index mutual fund that tracks the s&p 500, SPDRs provide a way to diversify your investment portfolio without having to own shares in all the s&p 500 companies yourself. However, while the net asset value (NAV) of an index fund is set only once a day, at the end of trading, the price of SPDRs, which are listed on the american stock exchange (AMEX), changes throughout the day, reflecting the constant changes in the index. SPDRs, which are part of a category of investments known as exchange traded funds, can be sold short or bought on margin as stocks can.Each quarter you receive a distribution based on the dividends paid on the stocks in the underlying portfolio, after trust expenses are deducted. If you choose, you can reinvest those distributions to buy additional shares.

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Definition / Meaning of

Flexible Spending Account

Categories: Retirement and Pension, Personnel Management,

Some employers offer flexible spending accounts (FSA), sometimes called cafeteria plans, as part of their employee benefits package. You contribute a percentage of your pretax salary, up to the limit your plan allows, which you can use to pay for qualifying expenses. Qualifying expenses include medical costs that aren't covered by your health insurance, childcare, care for your elderly or disabled dependents, and life insurance.The amount you put into the plan is not reported to the IRS as income, which means your taxable income is reduced. However, you have to estimate correctly the amount you'll spend during the year when you arrange to have amounts deducted from your paycheck. Once you decide on the amount you are going to contribute to an FSA for a year, you cannot change it unless you have a qualifying event, such as marriage or divorce.If you don't spend all that you had withheld within the year - or in some plans within the year plus a two-and-one-half month extension - you forfeit any amount that's left in your account.In some plans you pay for the qualifying expenses and are reimbursed when you file a claim. In other plans, you use a debit card linked to your account to pay expenses directly from the account.

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