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Meaning / Definition of

Unit Investment Trust (UIT)

Categories: Finance,

A UIT may be a fixed portfolio of bonds with specific maturity dates, a portfolio of income-producing stocks, or a portfolio of all of the securities included in a particular index. Examples of the latter include the DIAMONDs Trust (DIA), which mirrors the composition of the dow jones industrial average (DJIA), and Standard & Poor's depositary receipts (SPDR), which mirrors the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index (s&p 500). Index UITs are also described as exchange traded funds (ETFs).UITs resemble mutual funds in the sense that they offer the opportunity to diversify your portfolio without having to purchase a number of separate securities. You buy units, rather than shares, of the trust, usually through a broker. However, UITs trade more like stocks than mutual funds in the sense that you sell in the secondary market rather than redeeming your holding by selling your units back to the issuing fund. Further, the price of a UIT fluctuates constantly throughout the trading day, just as the price of an individual stock does, rather than being repriced only once a day, after the close of trading. As a result some UITs, though not index-based UITs such as DIAMONDS or SPDRs, trade at prices higher or lower than their net asset value (NAV). One additional difference is that many UITs have maturity dates, when the trust expires, while mutual funds do not. A fund may be closed for other reasons, but not because of a predetermined expiration date.

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Definition / Meaning of

Quarter

Categories: Investing and Trading, Accounting, Forex,

The financial world splits up its calendar into four quarters, each three months long. If January to March is the first quarter, April to June is the second quarter, and so on, though a company's first quarter does not have to begin in January.The securities and exchange commission (SEC) requires all publicly held US companies to publish a quarterly report, officially known as Form 10-Q, describing their financial results for the quarter. These reports and the predictions that market analysts make about them often have an impact on a company's stock price.For example, if analysts predict that a certain company will have earnings of 55 cents a share in a quarter, and the results beat those expectations, the price of the company's stock may increase. But if the earnings are less than expected, even by a penny or two, the stock price may drop, at least for a time.However, this pattern doesn't always hold true, and other forces may influence (investor) sentiment about the stock.

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